FEATURED NEWS

Many with migraines have vitamin deficiencies

Researchers uncertain whether supplementation would help prevent migraines

A high percentage of children, teens and young adults with migraines appear to have mild deficiencies in vitamin D, riboflavin and coenzyme Q10 — a vitamin-like substance found in every cell of the body that is used to produce energy for cell growth and maintenance.

These deficiencies may be involved in patients who experience migraines, but that is unclear based on existing studies.

“Further studies are needed to elucidate whether vitamin supplementation is effective in migraine patients in general, and whether patients with mild deficiency are more likely to benefit from supplementation,” says Suzanne Hagler, MD, a Headache Medicine fellow in the division of Neurology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and lead author of the study.

Dr. Hagler and colleagues at Cincinnati Children’s conducted the study among patients at the Cincinnati Children’s Headache Center. She will present her findings at 9:55 am Pacific time June 10, 2016 at the 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society in San Diego.

Dr. Hagler’s study drew from a database that included patients with migraines who, according to Headache Center practice, had baseline blood levels checked for vitamin D, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10 and folate, all of which were implicated in migraines, to some degree, by previous and sometimes conflicting studies. Many were put on preventive migraine medications and received vitamin supplementation, if levels were low. Because few received vitamins alone, the researchers were unable to determine vitamin effectiveness in preventing migraines.

She found that girls and young woman were more likely than boys and young men to have coenzyme Q10 deficiencies at baseline. Boys and young men were more likely to have vitamin D deficiency. It was unclear whether there were folate deficiencies. Patients with chronic migraines were more likely to have coenzyme Q10 and riboflavin deficiencies than those with episodic migraines.

Previous studies have indicated that certain vitamins and vitamin deficiencies may be important in the migraine process. Studies using vitamins to prevent migraines, however, have had conflicting success.


Story Source:

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

SPONSORIZED PARTNERS
allery_asthma_banner

WHAT'S TRENDING

You could be paying more for less effective medicine

drug_regulation_medical_costs

A new study suggests that weak drug regulation and misleading marketing can lead doctors to prescribe more expensive, riskier, and less beneficial drugs. “Under the Influence: The Interplay among Industry, Publishing, and Drug Regulation” appeared in the journal Accountability in Research. The article examines the “ghost management” of the process...

Continue reading

Health Topics

The Hot Debate: To Vaccinate or Not

As Director of Hospital Epidemiology for Cedars-Sinai, Rekha Murthy, MD, has led innovative programs to reduce the spread of hospital-acquired infections and communicable diseases. Dr. Murthy directed Cedars-Sinai’s widely imitated initiative to increase hand hygiene compliance among patient caregivers, including physicians. She also led a program to reduce environmental...

Continue reading

On Call with Dr. Lyons

As summer quickly comes to an end, our thoughts reluctantly begin to focus on Back to School. We start getting our homes “in order”, clothes and school supply shopping, cleaning out the summer sun, sand and fun of our thoughts so we can refocus our minds on the upcoming school year and all it brings. With that thought process, we tend to think about getting our health in order as well. Are the kids going to make it through the year “germ free”? Am I healthy enough to keep me and those around me going on the hectic schedule we call life?

In this issue we continue to give helping information about you and your family’s health. One very important part of keeping healthy is maintaining a healthy relationship with your family doctor. Cleveland Clinic gives us an informative perspective on this VIP we should all have access to (see page 16). Your Primary Care Physician (PCP) isn’t just for children, they should be your first resource in any stage of life and healthcare. Maintaining a long-term relationship with your PCP is a huge benefit in keeping you healthy.

As your thoughts turn to a seasonal change…we hope the information in this issue will continue to help you keep your healthcare goals.

Till next issue…

 

About What Doctors Know

Published by

What Doctors Know, LLC

Publisher and Chairman

Vicki J. Lyons, MD

Editorial and Design Director

Ran Stewart

Web and Digital Management

YourNext Services, LLC

Corporate Office
What Doctors Know
4403 Harrison Blvd. Suite 2855 Ogden, UT 84403 (801)512-0569

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

©2016 What Doctors Know

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?