Less-invasive mastectomy safe for more breast cancer patientsI have

A less-invasive mastectomy that leaves the surface of the breast intact has become a safe option for more patients.

According to a new study by the Mayo Clinic, this also includes those whose breast cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes or who have risk factors for surgical complications. In the procedure, known as a nipple-sparing mastectomy, surgeons remove breast tissue, leaving the skin, nipple and areola, and immediately rebuild the breasts. The findings are being presented at the American Society of Breast Surgeons annual meeting.

Researchers evaluated nipple-sparing mastectomy outcomes in 769 women who had the procedure between 2009 to 2017. In all, the surgery was performed on 1,301 breasts during the study period.

Complications within 30 days after surgery declined from 14.8% in 2009 to 6.3% in 2017, despite the fact that the procedure was offered to more women, including those whose cancer was locally advanced or who had surgical complication risk factors such as obesity or prior surgery, the study found.

At the one-year mark after surgery, reconstruction was considered a success in roughly 97 percent of cases.

Story Source: Mayo Clinic.

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